Critical Race Theory is a Marxist Fantasy

CNN subjective news anchor Don Lemon thinks parents opposing the teaching of Critical Race Theory to their children need to stop making it about themselves and to be curious, not judgmental.

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Ilhan Omar, the anti-Semitic representative Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and other prominent Dems don’t have the courage to kick off committees because the color of her skin is more important than her lack of character, says CRT isn’t even being taught in schools and is a “false narrative” pushed by Republicans.

Admiral Michael M. Gilday, the chief of naval operations, placed CRT author/activist Ibram X. Kendi’s book “How to Be an Anti-Racist,” on a recommended reading list for U.S. sailors because he believes “racism is in the United States Navy.”

Conservative groups and parents pushing back against the intellectually illiterate theory that all whites are oppressors and all other skin tones in God’s Crayola box of skin pigmentation are oppressed must be right over the target because anti-racist virtue signalers like Lemon, Omar and Gilday won’t shut their pie holes about the pushback against CRT.

Mr. Lemon – there’s nothing more appreciated than parenting advice from someone who has never parented and who doesn’t know the difference between news and opinion. What’s worse, your opinions are almost always wrong, like Trump being “racist-adjacent,” so we’ll just file this latest Lemon opinion where it belongs – in the woke waste can of wussy wisdom.

Rep Omar – you’re wrong about America being systemically racist but I will agree with you that America has a systemic problem – let’s call it “systemic stupidity.” Systemic stupidity has reached epidemic proportions in our country, thanks to you and your ilk.

Critical Race Theory is most certainly being taught in America’s schools, but what students really need to be taught is critical thinking, American exceptionalism and respect for our Judeo-Christian heritage. When that happens, people like you will be exposed as the charlatans and anti-American hatemongers you are.

Admiral Gilday – attention, swabby! Space Force Lt Col Matthew Lohmeier has warned us in his excellent book Irresistible Revolution how quickly wokeness and political correctness is infecting our military institutions and service ranks courtesy of anti-racism racists like yourself.

In a recent congressional hearing asking why you recommended Kendi’s book that opposes interracial adoption and capitalism, you said, “I would have to understand the context of statements made. I’m not going to cherry-pick quotes from somebody’s book.”

At least you are consistent with the whole “cherry picking” thing. On the contrary, you use a very broad brush when portraying the entire Caucasian race as oppressors and racists based on nothing more than Caucasians’ lack of melanin. Maybe CRT should be renamed Critical White Race Theory?

This shameless lack of commonsense and illogical reasoning is why millions of Americans oppose the teaching of CRT, the ridiculous “1619” theory espoused by Nikole Hannah-Jones and the New York Times, and the blatant lie that our founding documents were designed to oppress and suppress individual liberty and economic freedom for people of a darker hue.

The political left’s embrace and obsession with CRT shows how bat guano loco they have become since XiJoe and Giggles have been in charge.

Thanks for reading Dean Riffs. Welcome to all those who love American liberty, free enterprise, and who believe God has blessed our country. 

Sources: Townhall, TheGatewayPundit, Daily Signal

Photo sources: AmoMama, ABC News, New York Times

Copyright 2021, Dean A. George© 


Irresistible Revolution – Book Review

Type: Non-fiction

Category: Military Policy

Author: Matthew Lohmeier

Pages: 230

Publisher: Self-Published

List Price: (Paperback) $17.95

Matthew Lohmeier was never interested in writing a book. He still isn’t.

So how did his book become #1 on Amazon three days after he was relieved of his command as Space Force Lt. Col. Commander at Buckley Air Force Base in Colorado?

In a nutshell:

1. In May Lohmeier released Irresistible Revolution, a self-published book warning about the dangers of Marxism in the military.
2. On May 14th he was relieved of his duties as commander of the 11th Space Warning Squadron and accused of “prohibited partisan activity” in promoting his book on a podcast.
3. Three days later Lohmeier’s book was #1 on Amazon, who couldn’t keep the book in stock, and it remains a best seller at the time of this writing with an average 5-star review on both Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

The irony is Lohmeier’s “cancellation” was due to exactly what he warns about in his book – the mass psychosis of Critical Race Theory, the psychological shipwreck of identity politics and the wokeification of the military.

Lohmeier is a modern-day Paul Revere. Unlike citizen Revere though, Lohmeier has taken a huge chance with his military career.

In publishing his bold book that asserts how Marxism is embedded in our military institutions, he shows chapter and verse how critical race theory and Black Lives Matter propaganda is methodically creating division and distrust among the rank and file.

Lohmeier knows what is at stake and how critical it is to share what he’s seen firsthand. Like Revere, he is warning citizens far and wide of impending danger, but rather than incoming redcoats the danger he’s writing about is a different shade of red, namely Marxist red.

Irresistible Revolution consists of seven chapters divided into three parts: The Greatness of the American Ideal, Marxism’s Goal of Conquest, and Unmaking America’s Military.

In Chapter 1 the gutsy active duty Lt. Col. who graduated from the Air Force Academy in 2006 lays out how progressives are looking to infect America from within by transforming American history. One need look no further than the nightly evening news and the footage of furious mothers castigating school boards about their children being subjected to Critical Race Theory and the revisionist history of the 1619 Project to grasp the author’s thesis.

This same divisive drivel is also being taught at military institutions and bases nationwide and is making group of soldiers suspicious of one another based solely on their racial identities. “As servicemembers, you are left to choose whether you believe in the greatness of the American Ideal, or a Marxist delusion,” he writes.

Chapter 2 includes an excellent discussion on America’s Founding philosophy, ranging from the Declaration of Independence, to Abraham Lincoln’s entreaty for the Southern states to come back, to Calvin Coolidge’s defense of the Declaration when proponents of the decade-old Communist Party USA argued for a more modern form of government in the 1920’s.

“If all men are created equal, that is final. If they are endowed with inalienable rights, that is final. If governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, that is final. No advance, no progress can be made beyond these propositions,” Coolidge said in a Philadelphia speech commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence.

“If anyone wishes to deny their truth or their soundness, the only direction in which he can proceed historically is not forward, but backward toward the time when there was no equality, no rights of the individual, no rule of the people. Those who wish to proceed in that direction can not lay claim to progress. They are reactionary. Their ideas are not more modern, but more ancient, than those of the Revolutionary fathers,” the author quotes Coolidge as sharing that day.

Lohmeier sketches a comprehensive chronological history of Marxism in Chapters 3-5 and cites his reason for doing so: “…the ideological insistence that because one group of people is privileged it is necessarily a class of oppressors, and is therefore evil, all-too-naturally becomes justification for violence against that group,” Lohmeier writes in Chapter 4.

“Such a twisted view of humanity allows the practitioners of Marxism to harbor a victim mentality, and to point the finger at other citizens and blame them for life’s difficulties,” he concludes.

Chapter 5 shows us the many different faces of Marxism with the Marxist-inspired BLM front and center. BLM is one piece of a multifaceted Marxist puzzle designed to divide and antagonize different racial groups, and to their credit BLM has done a masterful job of making communistic principles popular, beginning with the choice of their name.

“‘Black lives matter’ is an irresistible slogan, and it was intentionally designed to be such. Because the slogan is irresistible, revolutionaries weaponize it to their advantage, shaming others who are not willing to bow down and apologize for their privilege or utter compelled phrases under the threat of violence,” Lohmeier writes.

Lohmeier notes at the conclusion of Chapter 5 that while military servicemembers have a legal obligation to remain apolitical, “Servicemembers are allowed to support the BLM movement. They are not, however, allowed to criticize it.”

Chapter 6 (The New American Military Culture) consists of personal anecdotes from the author, including exit interviews Lohmeier conducted illustrating why many experienced servicemembers are leaving the military in droves amid identity politics and DefSec Lloyd Austin’s Salem-esque witch hunt for “extremists.”

The sober-titled The Wrath to Come final chapter includes an illuminating transcript from Tucker Carlson’s January 19, 2021 broadcast about the left’s increasingly dangerous rhetoric towards conservatives. “I recognized that kind of rhetoric,” Lohmeier writes. “It was the ideologically possessed rhetoric of genocide.”

Lohmeier suggests stemming the incoming tide of Marxism is up to all of us, advising us to educate ourselves and “choose to be the kind of citizen that allows civil society to flourish.” He encourages us to avoid anger and violence, be courageous, pay attention, speak up and “help others see that lies and stereotypes based on sex, race, and other demographics only further divide the country.”

A chilling and sobering read, Lohmeier deserves a medal for courage in writing this vitally important book. If you read one work this year about the dangers of Critical Race Theory, identity politics and Marxist ideology, you won’t do better than Irresistible Revolution.

Photo sources: Amazon,com, latestcelebarticles.com, Military.com, GoFundMe.com

Thanks for reading Dean Riffs. Welcome to all those who love American liberty, free enterprise, and who believe God has blessed our country. 

Copyright 2021, Dean A. George© 



The Unbroken Thread: Discovering the Wisdom of Tradition in an Age of Chaos – Book Review

Type: Non-fiction

Category: Ethics

Author: Sohrab Ahmari

Pages: 299

Publisher: Convergent

List Price (Hardcover): $23.99

Donald Trump signed an executive order during his last week as president directing the construction of a National Garden of American Heroes “to reflect the awesome splendor of our country’s timeless exceptionalism.”

On May 14th President Joe Biden revoked that executive order to satisfy a political base that doesn’t believe in American exceptionalism or tradition – and presumably because Orange Man Bad suggested it.

Trump’s national Garden of Heroes may not have survived the politically correct weed whacking by recalcitrant wokesters, but readers of Sohrab Ahmari’s The Unbroken Thread – Discovering the Wisdom of Tradition in an Age of Chaos have been tossed a lifeline thread of wisdom in a literary garden blooming with hope and wisdom.

The op-ed editor of the New York Post, Ahmari’s concern for America’s current narcissistic culture pulses on every page of his bestselling book. Written in part for his toddler son, the Iranian-born author and former Muslim-turned-atheist-turned-Roman Catholic explores 12 existential questions about life that mankind has wrestled with since before the time of Christ.

While today’s woke Americans trash American history and Western Civilization by toppling statues, babbling incessantly about critical life theory and gender constructs, The Unbroken Thread taps into the wisdom of historic figures like Aristotle, Russian dissident Alexander Solzhenitsyn and Catholic saint Maximilian Kolbe for genuine answers to the true meaning of life, fulfillment and wisdom.

Parenthood and Christianity

When he was younger the author admittedly thought differently than he does today as a Christian convert and father. When his parents legally immigrated to the United States when he was 13, the teenager dove headfirst into the freedom of expression and thought his new country offered.

“Once I immigrated to the United States, I reveled in the chance to remake myself anew each day. My moral opinions were as interchangeable as my clothing styles and musical tastes. I could pick up and drop this ideology or that,” he writes in the Introduction. “I could be a high school “goth,” a college socialist, a law school neoconservative. I could dabble in drugs and build an identity around my dabbling.”

But after marrying his Chinese architect wife and becoming a parent, Ahmari said he found much of the West’s secularism lacking and empty.

“But what if that confidence of the modern world is an illusion, the product of a determined resolution not to confront the fundamental dilemmas of what it means to be fully human? Or what if beneath the moderns’ complacency lurks a deep soul-soreness?” he writes.

History’s Movers and Shakers

In 12 provocative chapters, Ahmari poses questions that he says modernists should be able to answer, questions like the scope and nature of reason; mankind’s responsibility to the past and future; how and what we worship; how we relate to each other, to our bodies, and to suffering and death.

The book is split evenly between two parts: The Things of God, and the Things of Mankind. Interwoven within the 12 biographies and the philosophical challenges faced by history’s intellectual heavyweights are anecdotes and observations from Ahmari’s personal experiences as a Catholic convert and new parent worried about his son’s future.

In Part 1, Ahmari provides fascinating portrayals of Christian apologist C.S. Lewis, Thomas Aquinas, Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, husband and wife sociologists Vic and Edie Turner, black theologian, author and civil rights leader Howard Thurman and Saint Augustine.

Part II and The Things of Mankind offers an interesting palette of biographies of Confucius, Britain’s Father John Henry Newman, Alexander Solzhenitsyn, the late feminist Andrea Dworkin, German philosopher Hans Jonas and the Roman philosopher Seneca.

In each portrayal, Ahmari provides compelling snapshots of his subject’s lives, warts and all. He shares how each chapter’s subject dealt with the book’s theme regarding the wisdom of committing to faith and serving others, juxtaposing their experiences with the same challenges confronting today’s selfies-obsessed, hedonistic culture.

Does God Respect You?

In Chapter 5’s Does God Respect You, the author peels away the prejudice and discrimination experienced by black theologian Howard Thurman in early 1900’s Daytona Beach. Using a pleasing narrative style sprinkled with fascinating details, Ahmari writes how Thurman used his Christian faith and powerful intellect to rebut a Hindu nationalist in Sri Lanka in 1935. The Sri Lankan intimated Thurman was a traitor to darker people because his Christian religion was used to discriminate against blacks in Thurman’s homeland.

“Jesus rejected hatred. It was not because he lacked the vitality or the strength. It was not because he lacked the incentive. Jesus rejected hatred because he saw that hatred meant death to the mind, death to the spirit, death to communion with his Father. He affirmed life; and hatred was the great denial,” Thurman wrote in his Christian classic, “Jesus and the Disinherited” describing his reasoning at the time.

Ahmari explained Thurman’s insight this way: “Fear, hypocrisy and hate are powerless before the Christ event – before the infinite Lord who bears the indignity of the finite, so that the finite might be raised to his infinite Lordship,” Ahmari wrote.

The author’s profile on the Catholic bishop Augustine (Chapter 6 – Does God Need Politics), illustrates how the revered saint tried the individualist philosophy as a successful teacher in Milan, Italy, before coming to the same personal realization that millions have encountered over their lifetimes; namely, “What does it profit a man to gain the whole world, yet forfeit his soul.” (Mark 8:36)

That spiritual insight and Augstine’s frequent discussions with pagan Romans about their failure to honor God led to his classic tale The City of God. In that book Augustine portrays “the entirety of human history as a tale of two cities: the earthly city, which sought its highest good in this world, and the city of God, which sought it in the next.”

Is Sex a Private Matter?

Not all the profiles Ahmari shares involve religious leaders, such as Chapter 10’s Is Sex a Private Matter? In this chapter Ahmari explores sexual schizophrenia, feminist Andrea Dworkin’s “ferocious” views on the subject, and while her views on pornography and the innate depravity of men as a gender were arguably correct, her refusal to embrace traditional views of male-female relations left her theory muddled and bleak and men without any hope of redemption.

It’s not every author that has the courage to tackle deeply penetrating questions concerning the societal cost of maximizing personal freedom, the difference between liberty and license, and whether the opportunity of freedom without limits is worth it.

America’s Founding Fathers understood the concept that freedom without faith isn’t really freedom, or as James Madison said, our Constitution requires “sufficient virtue among men for self-government,” otherwise, “nothing less than the chains of despotism can restrain them from destroying and devouring one another.”

You might say freedom today as we’ve traditionally known it hangs by a thread, but as Sohrab Ahmari has eloquently shown in his unique book, that thread remains unbroken if we demonstrate the wisdom of honoring tradition.

Thanks for reading Dean Riffs. Welcome to all those who love American liberty, free enterprise, and who believe God has blessed our country. 

Photo sources: Amazon, Catholic Herald, CICWashingtonDC, The Coming Home Network, Zola

Copyright 2021, Dean A. George©

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